medievalart
eadfrith:

mmmmmmmmm Honey!!
Medieval Bee Hive from The Luttrell Psalter - folio 204v
Manuscript made in Lincolnshire, England, between 1320-1340 for Sir Geoffrey Luttrell.
British Library, Add. MS 42130; Images from the British Library manuscript pages.
http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/FullDisplay.aspx?ref=Add_MS_42130


I think the honeybee is our only domesticated insect; don’t know of any other.  Honey bees are not native to the America’s; they were called White Man flies”. They only go feral if their keeper neglects them.

eadfrith:

mmmmmmmmm Honey!!

Medieval Bee Hive from The Luttrell Psalter - folio 204v

Manuscript made in Lincolnshire, England, between 1320-1340 for Sir Geoffrey Luttrell.

British Library, Add. MS 42130; Images from the British Library manuscript pages.

http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/FullDisplay.aspx?ref=Add_MS_42130

I think the honeybee is our only domesticated insect; don’t know of any other. Honey bees are not native to the America’s; they were called White Man flies”. They only go feral if their keeper neglects them.

mediumaevum

mediumaevum:

This insanely gorgeous home has an amazing story behind it.

Fonthill was the home of the American archeologist and tile maker Henry Chapman Mercer, in Doylestown, Pennsylvania. Built between 1908 and 1912, it is an early example of poured-in-place concrete and features 44 rooms, over 200 windows, 18 fireplaces and 10 bathrooms. The interior was originally painted in pastel colors, but age and sunlight have all but eradicated any hint of the former hues. It contains much built-in furniture and is embellished with decorative tiles that Mercer made at the height of the Arts and Crafts movement. It is filled with an extensive collection of ceramics embedded in the concrete of the house, as well as other artifacts from his world travels, including cuneiform tablets discovered in Mesopotamia dating back to over 2300 BCE. The home also contains around 1,000 prints from Mercer’s extensive collection, as well as over six thousand books, almost all of which were annotated by Mercer himself.

More images (by Karl Graf)

This house is open to the public. There is also a museum of American crafts and a number of Churches with Tiffany stained glass windows. Doylestown,north of Philadelphia is worth a visit.

ancientpeoples
ancientpeoples:

Faience hippopotamus 
Hippopotami were feared by the Egyptians because these animals are very destructive and dangerous. By making these statues the Egyptian hoped to controle those dangers and keep them at bay. The lotusflowers painted on the animals are symbols of fertility and the marshes where hippo’s mostly stayed. The goddess Taweret is a pregnant hippo and was worshipped by pregnant women to protect their unborn child. 
Egyptian, Middle Kingdom, 12th dynasty, 1960 - 1878 BC. 
Found in middle Egypt, Meir, Tomb of Senbi II
Source: Metropolitan Museum

This hippo is named William and was the icon for the Met’s Egyptian Collection. I have a copy.

ancientpeoples:

Faience hippopotamus 

Hippopotami were feared by the Egyptians because these animals are very destructive and dangerous. By making these statues the Egyptian hoped to controle those dangers and keep them at bay. The lotusflowers painted on the animals are symbols of fertility and the marshes where hippo’s mostly stayed. The goddess Taweret is a pregnant hippo and was worshipped by pregnant women to protect their unborn child. 

Egyptian, Middle Kingdom, 12th dynasty, 1960 - 1878 BC. 

Found in middle Egypt, Meir, Tomb of Senbi II

Source: Metropolitan Museum

This hippo is named William and was the icon for the Met’s Egyptian Collection. I have a copy.

pbsthisdayinhistory
pbsthisdayinhistory:

March 27, 1912: The First Japanese Cherry Blossom Trees Are Planted in the U.S.On this day in 1912, the first two Japanese cherry blossom trees were successfully planted by First Lady Helen Taft and Viscountess Chinda on the Tidal Basin in Washington, D.C. Japanese Mayor Yukio Ozaki of Tokyo gave the U.S. over 3,000 trees to demonstrate the growing relationship between the U.S. and Japan.Every spring, Washington D.C. commemorates the initial planting through the National Cherry Blossom Festival. This year, the peak bloom is forecast for April 8-12. 
As you wait for this year’s blooming period, treat yourself to this delicious spring recipe, a Raspberry, Pistachio, and Vanilla Semifreddo from PBS Food.Image: Cherry blossoms in Washington D.C. 2013 

The real hero was the Japanese industrialist who figured out how to get the trees safety across the world.  The first shipment died in route.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

March 27, 1912: The First Japanese Cherry Blossom Trees Are Planted in the U.S.

On this day in 1912, the first two Japanese cherry blossom trees were successfully planted by First Lady Helen Taft and Viscountess Chinda on the Tidal Basin in Washington, D.C. Japanese Mayor Yukio Ozaki of Tokyo gave the U.S. over 3,000 trees to demonstrate the growing relationship between the U.S. and Japan.

Every spring, Washington D.C. commemorates the initial planting through the National Cherry Blossom Festival. This year, the peak bloom is forecast for April 8-12.

As you wait for this year’s blooming period, treat yourself to this delicious spring recipe, a Raspberry, Pistachio, and Vanilla Semifreddo from PBS Food.

Image: Cherry blossoms in Washington D.C. 2013

The real hero was the Japanese industrialist who figured out how to get the trees safety across the world. The first shipment died in route.