historical-nonfiction

historical-nonfiction:

Caral-Supe, one of the great cradles of civilization. It arose near when the more famous ones in China and Mesopotamia did, around 2600 BCE. Caral-Supe, on the coast of modern-day Peru, grew thanks to the abundance of the sea. In this it was unique — other “cradles” were based on newly invented agiculture. Caral-Supe had monuments of stone. It had a writing system made of textiles. It did not have ceramics. Or decorations of any kind. I suppose it’s hard to invent something like drawing if no one has ever thought of it before.

Textiles are by definition “decorative”

anthrocity
anthrocity:

lafemmederaisin:

Re-purposing material can be fun.  Just take this black and white printed fabric for example.  It used to be a bed skirt that sat and sat and sat in a pile of other unused linens.  Now it’s several Plush Archaeology kits and Plush Archaeology totes.  Look up my store AnthroEstranged on Etsy and check out all my goodies.
https://www.etsy.com/shop/AnthroEstranged?ref=si_shop

This is too adorable. I have TWO archaeology friends having babies soon, this might have to be bought in bulk… 

Baby’s first fossil!

anthrocity:

lafemmederaisin:

Re-purposing material can be fun.  Just take this black and white printed fabric for example.  It used to be a bed skirt that sat and sat and sat in a pile of other unused linens.  Now it’s several Plush Archaeology kits and Plush Archaeology totes.  Look up my store AnthroEstranged on Etsy and check out all my goodies.

https://www.etsy.com/shop/AnthroEstranged?ref=si_shop

This is too adorable. I have TWO archaeology friends having babies soon, this might have to be bought in bulk… 

Baby’s first fossil!

historical-nonfiction

historical-nonfiction:

The Church of Scientology has been active in Germany since 1970.It currently has 4,000 adherents (according to the German government) and 12,000 (according to the Church of Scientology). However, Scientology occupies a precarious legal and social position. The German government considers it an…

Scientology was created one boozy night in an Ohio basement by L. Ron Hubbard and a fellow sci-fi writer named Smith as a way to secure a steady income.

theslouchylibrarian

theslouchylibrarian:

My mermaid parade costume!  I did a shoot a few days after the parade so the crowds wouldn’t be an issue.  Big ups to Danny Axel for his beautiful photographs.  I made almost all of this costume in a single night.  My sister made the exquisite ‘Pearly Whites’ necklace I’m wearing for last year’s parade, and I cut & hemmed my top skirt a week before, but everything else!  On Friday night (into Saturday morning), I:

- Gave myself a sweet skin fade, trimmed my mohawk, and dyed it aqua

-Attempted and failed to batik dye ships I’d drawn for this project onto the top skirt, sewed on the green ribbon waistband, and gathered it in the front to show my underskirts, accented with classy plastic aquarium seaweed

-Gathered several lengths of tulle, pinned and sewed them to a $3 bandeau top, then dyed it royal blue with white tips on the stovetop to make the underskirts.

-Sawed my turtle shell in half, lined it with felt, marked & drilled holes in all my various shells, strung them onto a clothesline & then knotted it strategically to keep them in place.  My earrings are a large turitella shell and a landsnail shell, which I drilled small holes in & then attached to earring hooks with green embroidery floss.  I used the same floss to tie smaller turitellas, a snail shell, and a scorpion conch to my bikini top.  My starfish are stuck on with clear eyelash glue.  I bought all my shells at The Evolution Store in SoHo, where I spent way too much money.  

Not too shabby for one night, eh?  Of course, I’d been drawing and planning it for months, slowly acquiring the various materials I needed.  I went to a department store and bought real grown-up lady makeup for the first time because I wanted to look ‘dewy’ in these photos and I had no idea how.  I had a tie dye party 3 weeks before to make sure I could competently dye fabrics in preparation for making the skirts.  I drew my first sketch of this costume in February.  So really, It was many months in the making, but when it comes to building, I guess I just like to marathon it.  

I knew I’d done a good job turning myself into a real mermaid because most of my photo requests were from enraptured little girls, tugging their mom’s sleeves and asking them to ask me to take a picture with them :)

The measure of success was those little girls - you were exactly what they think a Mremaid/Sea Goddess should look like! Congrats!

historical-nonfiction
historical-nonfiction:

During the crusages in the Middle Ages, European crusaders encountered a new kind of blade, with a distinctive grain pattern. This was damascus steel, made from the damascene process of thrusting a superheated blade in the body of a slave and then into cold water. India had discovered the technique, and exported the steel to the Middle East. Crusaders discovered, to their dismay, that swords made of Damascus steel were more resilient and harder than those of European manufacture. Europeans did not discover the secret until 500 years after the Crusades, however, when it was discovered that thrusting a red-hot sword into a mass of animal skins soaking in water had a similar effect to the Damascus method. The nitrogen given off by the skins in the water produces a chemical reaction in the steel

Ah, the good old days!

historical-nonfiction:

During the crusages in the Middle Ages, European crusaders encountered a new kind of blade, with a distinctive grain pattern. This was damascus steel, made from the damascene process of thrusting a superheated blade in the body of a slave and then into cold water. India had discovered the technique, and exported the steel to the Middle East. Crusaders discovered, to their dismay, that swords made of Damascus steel were more resilient and harder than those of European manufacture. Europeans did not discover the secret until 500 years after the Crusades, however, when it was discovered that thrusting a red-hot sword into a mass of animal skins soaking in water had a similar effect to the Damascus method. The nitrogen given off by the skins in the water produces a chemical reaction in the steel

Ah, the good old days!